Tag Archives: customer

Categories in a nutshell

Categories

I wanted to write this post to try and explain why we use categories in ITSM tools such as Remedy, Servicenow etc and why I think there is a need to be monitored regularly.

Lets start at the beginning, when logging and incident or request the team categorises the incident or request.

Please can I have Photoshop installed? – Category = Request – Software – Photoshop – Install

Or

I can’t connect to any network shares – Category = Incident – Network – Loss of network connectivity – Desktop

These categories choices are open to debate and discussion, that’s the beauty of ITIL, it is open to debate and a guide. You have to work out what works best for you and your company.

The next step in ITIL, remember you whole reason for doing ITIL is to provide value to the business, is to analyse these incidents in Incident Management. This should highlight trends, eg reviewing the incidents shows 30 calls per week to install photoshop, which is taking an engineer 30 mins per install to do. Maybe, this could be automated and therefore giving 15 hours back to the engineers and providing a better, quicker service to the business. More importantly, you can see trends with incidents, the incident with the network shares, you notice this happens to the same person every week at 2pm on a Tuesday. A reboot fixes this but it keeps happening and is probably a clue that a problem should be raised and looked at this in more detail.

One of the reasons to logged problems is if incidents are trending but the root cause isn’t found, then these can be looked into in more detail and hopefully finding the root cause. Once the root cause is found and resolved, then the incident shouldn’t happen again, meaning a happy customer and your engineers can work on something else. The whole point of incident management is to look at ways to reduce the number of incidents and requests.

However, how many categories do you have in your organisation? Could an incident be categorised few different ways depending on who picks it up? Are there duplications of categories / sub categories? How often do you look at your categories and check if they are still relevant and if some should be added or deleted?

These questions I think are the crux of why I think categories need to be monitored. Do you need all the categories / sub categories? When were each last used? A lot of ITSM tools has loads and loads of categories…….are they all used and would the engineers who are logging the incidents know which one to use or could they use a few different combinations? If so, are you sure your incident management trend analysis is picking up all the incidents and giving the true picture of what is happening week on week? How often are the categories reviewed? Do you still have a category for Windows Server 2000….do you have any servers still running Windows Server 2000?

A possible solution would be this; rip down the top level categories to your primary services in Service Catalogue eg Telecoms, E-mail etc. Using your engineers previous experience, reviewing any trends of incidents/requests and intuition make up some sub categories, limit the sub categories to less than 10 and add other to all these categories. This gives a better chance to trend incidents and requests in future. However, add ‘other’ to the sub categories so any incidents that don’t match the categories can be logged under the ‘other’ category. Create a workshop for engineers to explain which type of incidents/requests should be logged under which category and what the ‘other’ category is for and document this.

On a regular basis, initially, review the incidents and categories; looking at why the ‘other’ category has been used, does another category need to be added? This is fine-tuning the incident categories. Are the engineers using the right categories for the right types of incidents and requests?

On a bi yearly basis, a review of all categories should take place, are these still all relevant? Does some need to be deleted or added? Are you able to see trends and are you taking steps to reduce them?

I hope this shows how important getting categories right and making sure these are monitored to keep them in check.

Thankyou for reading my post. This is my opportunity to blog about a subject I love but am still learning. These posts are my way of showing how I understand the subject, however, I would encourage you to leave comments, did you agree / disagree with the post? Did I not explain something well enough or incorrectly? Do you want me to blog about another subject within ITIL? All feedback helps me to understand more. Thankyou.

 

Service Management as a rugby game

ITSM rugby

I realise the game of rugby might not be the most obvious analogy which springs to mind when you think about Service Management but hear me out.

Rugby, for me, has always been a great spectator sport; I have more the physique of the ball and not the man mountains of players. I marvel at the discipline these giants display for the game and how the game does not descend into a bar room brawl with so much muscle and will to win in such a small area.

When I think about great IT customer support, it is all about the skills of the individuals and the hand over to other support teams. How skill and great hand overs to other support teams can win or lose the IT support game. IT support is always a battle between resolving the issues efficiently without taking too much time and customer frustration increasing.

Picture the field, the IT organisation vs Customer Frustration and Time. The whistle blows, it is game time!!! The ball goes into the IT service desk scrum and the incident ball comes out to the IT organisation’s support team, the first line engineer is running with the incident ball only to be put to ground by Time. Over the top comes support from the second line teams, the ball is handed over to the second line engineer seamlessly, the engineer side steps Customer Frustration with clear communication. Oh no, Time comes in, tackles the ball and is now running with it, second line support chases the ball down. Time’s lead is growing with Customer Frustration following up quickly behind but Time is skilfully tackled by second line and runs the ball back, the final ball is handed over to the third line engineer. The fastest and most experienced players on the field with lightning footwork the ball goes down for the try and the incident is resolved.

Without great hand over’s of the ball, Customer Frustration and Time would get the ball and the value for money for all the business areas, who have paid money to see the IT organisation win, isn’t seen. If the support individual cannot hand the incident ball off to each other, individual player must try and jink past the opposition to try and close the incident. This sometimes will work based on the skill of the individual support engineer and the ease of which the incident could be closed, but sometimes it will not. If the IT organisation can win with individual skill, great hand over’s and team work then the business areas sees the value of paying to come support the IT organisation.

The other thing I enjoy about rugby, and most other sports, is the analysis of all parts of play, the breakdown and repeats of every tackle, shot, space the players should of used etc.

This is the area, where the service management team comes in, the coaches. They can take apart the play; they see the 1st line engineer fumbles the ball on pick up. A work around could be designed for the present game but a problem could be created to go away and really analyse the issue to come up with a fix, maybe a grip on the some gloves or a textured ball to make it less slippery. Communication between the second and third line support teams might be poor so the ball was intercepted and needing to be won back. Encouraging better communication between the two leads to be better and more fluid play.

Various areas of improvement could be categories, like in the ITSM tools, to be later broken down into target areas eg running down the line, communication, creating space etc, which can be work upon away from the game in set areas of expertise.

The service management team can also look at the agreements between the various team members showing who is going to take the hand off ball and who is going to come and protect the ball. This goes some way to designing an OLA. An agreement between the IT organisations showing how an incident should be handled, the support timings and items covered by the agreement. This should be in a format, that in the heat of play, can be easily understood and quickly.

Documenting how set piece of play should be played. Making sure all team members know what is required and how to do something is also an important part of the Service Management team’s job.

IT service management is all about creating value for the business areas and the best customer experience. The play might not be the finish article and individuals and team might need some work, but if the IT organisation is committed to ITIL and service management, they will work at these areas, making small and large gains and improvements. Reminding why the business areas pay for their IT organisation and the value it creates.

Hopefully I have gone some way to try and convince you that rugby and IT service management are not too dissimilar after all.

Thankyou for reading my post. This is my opportunity to blog about a subject I love but am still learning. These posts are my way of showing how I understand the subject, however, I would encourage you to leave comments, did you agree / disagree with the post? Did I not explain something well enough or incorrectly? Do you want me to blog about another subject within ITIL? All feedback helps me to understand more. Thankyou.