Categories in a nutshell

Categories

I wanted to write this post to try and explain why we use categories in ITSM tools such as Remedy, Servicenow etc and why I think there is a need to be monitored regularly.

Lets start at the beginning, when logging and incident or request the team categorises the incident or request.

Please can I have Photoshop installed? – Category = Request – Software – Photoshop – Install

Or

I can’t connect to any network shares – Category = Incident – Network – Loss of network connectivity – Desktop

These categories choices are open to debate and discussion, that’s the beauty of ITIL, it is open to debate and a guide. You have to work out what works best for you and your company.

The next step in ITIL, remember you whole reason for doing ITIL is to provide value to the business, is to analyse these incidents in Incident Management. This should highlight trends, eg reviewing the incidents shows 30 calls per week to install photoshop, which is taking an engineer 30 mins per install to do. Maybe, this could be automated and therefore giving 15 hours back to the engineers and providing a better, quicker service to the business. More importantly, you can see trends with incidents, the incident with the network shares, you notice this happens to the same person every week at 2pm on a Tuesday. A reboot fixes this but it keeps happening and is probably a clue that a problem should be raised and looked at this in more detail.

One of the reasons to logged problems is if incidents are trending but the root cause isn’t found, then these can be looked into in more detail and hopefully finding the root cause. Once the root cause is found and resolved, then the incident shouldn’t happen again, meaning a happy customer and your engineers can work on something else. The whole point of incident management is to look at ways to reduce the number of incidents and requests.

However, how many categories do you have in your organisation? Could an incident be categorised few different ways depending on who picks it up? Are there duplications of categories / sub categories? How often do you look at your categories and check if they are still relevant and if some should be added or deleted?

These questions I think are the crux of why I think categories need to be monitored. Do you need all the categories / sub categories? When were each last used? A lot of ITSM tools has loads and loads of categories…….are they all used and would the engineers who are logging the incidents know which one to use or could they use a few different combinations? If so, are you sure your incident management trend analysis is picking up all the incidents and giving the true picture of what is happening week on week? How often are the categories reviewed? Do you still have a category for Windows Server 2000….do you have any servers still running Windows Server 2000?

A possible solution would be this; rip down the top level categories to your primary services in Service Catalogue eg Telecoms, E-mail etc. Using your engineers previous experience, reviewing any trends of incidents/requests and intuition make up some sub categories, limit the sub categories to less than 10 and add other to all these categories. This gives a better chance to trend incidents and requests in future. However, add ‘other’ to the sub categories so any incidents that don’t match the categories can be logged under the ‘other’ category. Create a workshop for engineers to explain which type of incidents/requests should be logged under which category and what the ‘other’ category is for and document this.

On a regular basis, initially, review the incidents and categories; looking at why the ‘other’ category has been used, does another category need to be added? This is fine-tuning the incident categories. Are the engineers using the right categories for the right types of incidents and requests?

On a bi yearly basis, a review of all categories should take place, are these still all relevant? Does some need to be deleted or added? Are you able to see trends and are you taking steps to reduce them?

I hope this shows how important getting categories right and making sure these are monitored to keep them in check.

Thankyou for reading my post. This is my opportunity to blog about a subject I love but am still learning. These posts are my way of showing how I understand the subject, however, I would encourage you to leave comments, did you agree / disagree with the post? Did I not explain something well enough or incorrectly? Do you want me to blog about another subject within ITIL? All feedback helps me to understand more. Thankyou.

 

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s